Guidelines

Determine Your Risk

The following guidelines can help you determine if you should seek risk assessment:

If you or a family member has a history of breast or ovarian cancer:

  • Breast cancer before age 45.
  • Breast cancer before age 50 with at least one relative with ovarian cancer and/or a relative with breast cancer before age 50.
  • Breast cancer after age 50 as well as at least one of the following:
    • A male relative with breast cancer at any age.
    • Two or more relatives with breast cancer.
    • Ashkenazi Jewish heritage.
    • Ovarian cancer at any age.
    • Personal history of male breast cancer.
    • Both breast cancer and ovarian cancer at any age.

Having a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation is an inherited condition that causes an increased risk for early onset breast cancer, often before age 50, and ovarian cancer.

If you have no personal history of breast or ovarian cancer:

  • A first-degree relative* with bilateral breast cancer.
  • A first- or second-degree relative* with both breast and ovarian cancer at any age or a combination of breast and ovarian cancer in two relatives.
  • A male relative with breast cancer.
  • Two relatives with breast cancer, at least one diagnosed before age 50.
  • More than two relatives with breast cancer, at any age.
  • A combination of two or more relatives with ovarian cancer at any age.

For those of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, without a personal history:

  • Any first-degree relatives with breast or ovarian cancer.
  • Two second-degree relatives on the same side of the family with breast or ovarian cancer.

If you or a family member has a history of colon or endometrial cancer:

  • Colorectal cancer before age 50.
  • Colorectal polyps before age 40.
  • Endometrial (uterine) cancer before age 50.
  • Relative with a known Lynch Syndrome** gene mutation.
  • You or a relative have had two or more Lynch Syndrome related cancers, such as two colorectal cancers or both colorectal and endometrial cancer.
  • Two or more members of your family have been affected with any Lynch Syndrome related cancer with one cancer before age 50, such as having had colorectal cancer and your mother had endometrial cancer.

Personal history of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) Syndrome, an inherited disorder of the large intestine:

  • Individuals clinically affected with FAP (100 or more colorectal adenomas).
  • Individuals with multiple colorectal adenomas.
  • First-degree relative with a known Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) or MYH mutation.

*A first-degree relative is a sibling, parent, or offspring; a second degree relative is a grandparent, aunt, uncle, grandchild, niece or nephew.

**Lynch Syndrome is an inherited condition that causes an increased risk for colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer.

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